Supplements

A Functional Medicine Approach to Addressing Psoriasis

Psoriasis is an autoimmune condition that targets the skin, and plaques that result commonly appear on the elbows, knees or scalp. The plaques can however show up on any part of the body.

 

Normally your body will produce new skin cells and shed old ones every 28-30 days. With psoriasis, your immune system is in overdrive, leading to skin inflammation, causing skin cell turnover to occur much faster than normal. Instead of taking 28-30 days for skin cells to turnover, new cells are pushed to the surface in just 3-4 days. Because your body can’t shed the old, dead cells as fast, they pile up and begin to form thick, red, itchy, flaky, scaly patches referred to as plaques. Some people report burning and stinging from the plaques. 

 

Conventional medicine looks at psoriasis as a skin condition, however it’s important to know that it actually starts underneath the skin and is a chronic disease of the immune system (as are other autoimmune conditions).

 

Because imbalances of the immune system are involved, we must look for underlying causes of why this is occurring. If we do not address the underlying cause, it is left to persist, and it will cause additional problems over time.

 

While the exact cause of psoriasis is unknown, there are a variety of factors involved that when occur together result autoimmunity, and in some people, the symptoms of psoriasis. 

 

Autoimmunity is the result of a genetic component, an environmental trigger, and impaired gut function. Environmental triggers can include stress, diet and nutrient deficiency, food allergies and food sensitivities, medications, and toxins for example. Impaired gut function may be due to inadequate digestion and absorption (which can lead to nutrient deficiency), imbalances and infections of the gut microbiome (which is your gut bacteria, and may be referred to as dysbiosis), and increased gut permeability (which is commonly referred to as leaky gut). 

 

While we can’t change our genetics, we can identify and work to eliminate environmental triggers and address impaired gut health, and thus bring psoriasis (and other autoimmune conditions) into remission in a natural, holistic manner.

 

From a functional and clinical nutrition standpoint, the search for the cause of immune system dysregulation begins in the gut. Up to 80% of our immune system is located in our gut microbiome. Therefore imbalances in our gut microbiome can have far reaching effects on our overall health.

 

Psoriasis is associated with differences in the gut microbiome when compared to the microbiomes of healthy individuals without psoriasis. These differences can adversely impact the immune system by triggering specific, inflammatory immune responses. Interactions between the gut microbiome and the immune system therefore suggest the composition of the microbiome represents a therapeutic target for managing psoriasis.

 

In addition to the composition of the microbiome and the role it plays in psoriasis, increased intestinal permeability is involved, and this connection has been known for decades. In this scenario, inflammation in the gut (which can arise from a variety of factors including food allergies and food sensitivities, and gut dysbiosis for example) causes the normally tight junctions between the cells of the intestinal walls to loosen. When this occurs food particles and toxins from bacteria are allowed to inappropriately enter the blood stream. Once there, the body identifies them as invaders (because they are not supposed to be there) and mounts an immune response. As long as gut inflammation and subsequent leaky gut persist, the immune system will be chronically stimulated, leading to autoimmune conditions, like psoriasis.

 

There are a variety of nutrient deficiencies common in skin conditions such as psoriasis, including omega 3 fish oils, zinc, vitamin B2, niacin, vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin DEating foods that are rich in these nutrients, and other nutrients that are important for skin health is paramount for healthy skin.

 

While “medicine deficiency does not cause psoriasis, nutritional deficiency might.”

 

Adequate detoxification is also important because toxin build up that cannot be excreted via normal routes (through the liver and bowels for example) can make its way out through the skin causing flares in skin conditions. 

 

In addition to addressing the gut microbiome, the skin has its own microbiome that needs to be addressed, and the skin microbiome also plays a role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

 

Addressing psoriasis, other autoimmune conditions, or any chronic condition you may have that has not resolved with conventional means involves some important considerations that include the following: 

 

  • Taking into account your biochemistry, and uncovering the root cause of imbalances that may be contributing to your health problems. This is the functional medicine approach. All of the systems in your body are connected. When one is not functioning optimally and the root cause is left to persist, it can adversely affect other systems, creating a domino effect of illness and disease. Medications mask symptoms, leaving us unaware of the continued damage that is occurring within. Functional nutrition is the core of functional medicine and can help you reach optimal health with natural means.
  • Keep in mind we aren't just what we eat. We are what our bodies can do with what we eat. Rather than only making sure you are eating right, we need to make sure your body can digest, absorb and use nutrients from the foods you eat. Your diet may be stellar, but if your body can't use those nutrients, your perfect diet doesn't matter much. For example, impaired digestion can cause dysbiosis, leaky gut, and nutrient deficiencies, among other issues.
  • Nutrient supplementation can be a key factor for improving overall metabolic function, and therefore it can positively impact the issues you are experiencing. Often, due to long standing deficiency and imbalances, the addition of supplemental nutrients can help restore metabolic processes to their optimal state.
  • Too often, our conventional lab results are "normal" yet we still don't feel well.  While labs may appear "normal" for conventional medical practice, they can be far from optimal and therefore underlying dysfunction can be causing your symptoms. This underlying dysfunction is where our opportunity lies to improve your health.
  • Exercise, getting enough sleep, and stress management are examples of lifestyle factors that play a major role in your overall health.

 

As you may have noticed, these factors are not typically considered in conventional medical practice. This is why a functional approach can produce results, where conventional interventions often fall flat. 

 

For assistance with identifying your root causes and developing a customized protocol for your unique biochemistry to address your psoriasis (or other autoimmune conditions), contact me today!

 

Ready to get started? Click here to schedule your 30-minute strategy session with me.

 

Not ready to work together longer term and want to pick my brainClick here to set up your wellness coaching session with me!


 
"Your nutritional needs are as unique as your fingerprint, and they are dictated by your individual biochemistry. As a functional and clinical nutritionist, I can help you interpret your body's nutrient needs and customize a plan to reach your health and wellness goals. This is personalized nutrition."
 
-Jennifer Caryn Brand, MPH, MS, CNS, Clinical Nutritionist
 

Do you need to take supplements? And if so, which ones?

Photo credit:  pixabay.com

Photo credit: pixabay.com

 

In functional medicine, we focus on natural ways to improve our health. That means food first. The functional medicine approach looks for the underlying causes of disease and illness and addresses it in order to improve health status. Health begins in the gut and often the underlying cause of what ails us is digestive and metabolic dysfunction.

 

Functional medicine practitioners use nutrient supplements, along with food, in clinical practice as the primary tools of treatment.

 

I've been asked, can't food be enough? After all, as a clinical nutritionist the expectation is that I'm going to create a diet plan to make you feel better. Yes! This is part of what I do. 

 

Sometimes, food isn't enough. This can happen as we age and bodily processes slow down and need a little extra help, when we have a functional deficit in a metabolic pathway, when our hormones become imbalanced, and when our guts aren't functioning the way they're supposed to. These are just some examples of when we may need a little more than what even the best, most thought through food plan can provide.

 

Our every day lives expose us to stress, environmental toxins, and lack of physical activity. We also experience inadequate exposure to sunlight, and many other problems associated with the 'conveniences' of Western society.

 

It is for these reasons that we can benefit from supplementing our healthful diets with extra nutrients. Some can help support metabolic pathways and therefore the biochemical reactions that make our bodies run. Others help support our immune system and combat oxidative stress and inflammation, two causes of chronic and complex disease.

 

I do believe that most of us can benefit from taking certain supplements. 

 

To learn more about my take on specific supplement recommendations, and for access to professional grade ones --> click here <--.

 

Nutrient supplements are not medications. Prescription medications work by altering metabolic pathways, and even sometimes by shutting them down. All of the processes in our body are connected. When one is interrupted it can affect all others leading to chronic and complex disease. Nutrient supplements provide fuel (just as food can, when all else is in balance) for these processes to help them run. This is the difference between conventional medicine and the functional approach. 

 

So, are nutrient supplements necessary, and can't we get everything we need from food? My answers are yes, and maybe not. 

 

Most of us know what a healthy diet should look like. When you are following a healthful eating plan and are still having symptoms that can't be explained or tied to anything in particular, this is when food may not be enough. If this sounds familiar I can help you get to the bottom of it.

 

To contact me --> click here <--.

 

If you're ready for a strategy session with me --> click here <--.

 

Are you looking for general information and just want to pick my brain? --> click here <--.

 

 "Your nutritional needs are as unique as your fingerprint, and they are dictated by your individual biochemistry. As a functional and clinical nutritionist, I can help you interpret your body's nutrient needs and customize a plan to reach your health and wellness goals. This is personalized nutrition."
-Jennifer Caryn Brand, MPH, MS, CNS, Functional and Clinical Nutritionist
 


Wishing you a delicious weekend!



Jennifer
Functional and Clinical Nutritionist

MTHFR. WTH?

What the _ _ _ _ is MTHFR? I've found myself explaining this to several clients recently.

 

I felt like I had a never-ending influx of clients with skin problems, and now MTHFR is popping up.  There are some connections, because of course things are always connected. If you've been following me you're probably aware of this!

 

We tend to look at our symptoms as isolated problems, and this is why we don’t get better. Our symptoms are our body’s attempt to tell us something is wrong. Instead of listening to our bodies, we shut them up with medications.  All this does is mask symptoms, allowing underlying dysfunction to continue. Until we address it, deterioration continues, and now we are unaware this is happening because symptoms are covered up… until new symptoms pop up. And they will, because remember everything is connected, and that underlying dysfunction is still present and still causing further deterioration. 

 

MTHFR is a gene that makes an enzyme called methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. This enzyme is involved in what are called methylation reactions, which act like a switch turning things on and off in your body. These reactions are needed to process amino acids to make proteins, for RNA and DNA synthesis, detoxification, breaking down histamine, and much more.

 

This enzyme is necessary for chemical reactions that use vitamin B9, which is folate, or folic acid (the synthetic version of folate). It converts folic acid into a form that can be used by your body (methylfolate). Vitamins B12 and B6 are also important for methylation reactions, in particular converting homocysteine into methionine (something we want to have happen).

 

When MTHFR isn’t working, these reactions are interrupted and a wide range of problems can result, including those associated with a deficiency of these B vitamins.

 

If you have MTHFR and take supplements, it is important to avoid folic acid. You want to take the appropriate, activated forms of these B vitamins, and eat foods that naturally contain them.

 

To learn more about nutrients that support methylation and foods they are in --> click here <-- to access my therapeutic diet for methylation.

 

Folate is absolutely necessary for a healthy nervous system, normal growth and development (this is why women are instructed to take supplemental folic acid when of childbearing age, as the fetus needs it to grow and develop normally) and forming red blood cells. Symptoms of folate deficiency are many and can include:

 

  • Anemia

  • Cracks in the corners of the mouth

  • Red, sore tongue

  • Irritability

  • Depression

  • Fatigue

  • Forgetfulness

  • Lack of concentration

  • Mental confusion

  • Insomnia

  • Anxiety

  • Dizziness

  • Headaches

  • Muscle weakness

  • Numbness in legs

  • Difficulty in walking

  • Cramps

  • Digestive problems

  • Constipation

  • Diarrhea

  • Hypoglycemia

  • Birth defects

  • Gout

  • Cardiovascular disease

  • Diabetes

  • Poor appetite

 

Symptoms of folate deficiency are similar to B12 deficiency. In fact, treating folate deficiency alone can mask the symptoms of B12 deficiency. This is a serious problem because B12 deficiency can cause irreversible neurological and nerve damage. GET TESTED!

 

There are different forms of the MTHFR mutation, and depending on which you have it may cause more severe problems. Problems associated with MTHFR may include:

 

  • Elevated homocysteine (associated with an increased risk for heart disease)

  • Depression and anxiety

  • Autoimmune disorders

  • Thyroid disorders

  • Migraine

  • Fibromyalgia

  • Chronic fatigue syndrome

  • Digestive problems like irritable bowel syndrome

  • Problems with fertility and pregnancy

  • And more…

 

What's the connection between MTHFR and skin? Itchy skin for example, is often associated with histamine reactions. Histamine is released by cells in your immune system when there is a trigger. Histamine is responsible for allergy-like symptoms we get, and this is why anti-histamines are prescribed and work to keep allergy symptoms under control, including itching. This means that excess histamine can lead to uncontrollable allergy symptoms, including itching.

 

Histamine is broken down by methylation. If methylation isn’t working, you can have excess histamine, and symptoms associated with it (like itching). Histamine is made in the body naturally, and it’s also found in a variety of foods. When histamine coming in exceeds histamine going out, which is more common in those with MTHFR, symptoms can result and persist.

 

Also, folic acid increases histamine levels, and methylfolate degrades it. Deficiency of methylfolate leads to high levels of histamine, and those with MTHFR are very often deficient.

 

What to do? If you have symptoms like those mentioned and can’t seem to figure out why, getting checked for MTHFR is a good idea. You can also check your homocysteine levels, and there are indicators of B12 and B9 deficiency (or sufficiency) that can be found in a CBC (complete blood count).

 

It’s also important to work with a qualified health practitioner (like a functional and clinical nutritionist) who can help guide you through necessary testing, diet, lifestyle and supplement interventions customized for your biochemistry. Diet plays a large role in managing the affects MTHFR can have on your body, beyond just B vitamins, and addressing these factors can put you back on track to feeling better!

 

Suffering from skin conditions like eczema?

Jennifer Caryn Brand Nutrition, Eczema Food Triggers Ebook

Uncontrollably itchy skin, eczema covering your body, for the love of... You can't for the life of you figure out what's causing it. You've tried it all.

 

●      Prescription skin creams

●      Elimination diets

●      'Clean' skin care products

●      Antihistamine medications

●      Baths and soaks

●      Coconut oil (it fixes everything right?)

 

The list goes on and none of it works...

 

I've got news for you. Not only can I help you address your skin issues, I’m so excited to share with you that I have a new ebook on the subject! 

 

Here's a little background...

 

I was asked to participate in the first ever Psoriasis and Eczema Awareness Week event, coming up super soon, April 16-22, 2018.

 

The event is a 100% online event and it will include tons of resources that will support and inspire people out there (just like you) who have found that conventional recommendations just aren’t working. By no means are we making claims about cures here… this event is based on science and functional medicine approaches to address underlying root cause issues that are often overlooked or ignored.

 

The event will include expert interviews (from doctors, dietitians, scientific researchers, herbalists, and more) along with eBooks, eCookbooks and other guides that can help you get answers sooner.

 

Stay tuned for more details on the event, and to learn how you can access the important and useful information that will be shared by me, and a number of my colleagues. You’ll be hearing about skin health from the experts in the field, and learn what you can do to help resolve your troublesome skin issues.

 

There will be giveaways during the event, and deals on products that can help promote healthy skin.

 

So about my ebook, it’s called Eczema Food Triggers Addressing Eczema From The Inside Out. It in you’ll learn about 10 different ‘chemicals’ found in natural, healthy foods that can cause some people’s eczema to flare up. You’ll also learn why this can happen, and what can be done about it. Here’s a hint, it isn’t all about diet, and it isn’t as simple as just removing triggering foods from your diet.

 

I’ll be speaking about this during the first ever Psoriasis and Eczema Awareness Week event, April 16-22, 2018, so mark your calendars and again, stay tuned for more details on how you’ll be able to access it.

 

In the meantime, you can download my Eczema Food Triggers Cheat Sheet for free. --> click here <-- to get your free PDF document.

 

To get your hands on the ebook --> click here <--!

 

To work with me to resolve your skin problems --> click here <-- and schedule your 30 minute strategy session today!

 

"Your nutritional needs are as unique as your fingerprint, and they are dictated by your individual biochemistry. As a functional and clinical nutritionist, I can help you interpret your body's nutrient needs and customize a plan to reach your health and wellness goals. This is personalized nutrition."
-Jennifer Caryn Brand, MPH, MS, CNS, Clinical Nutritionist


 
Wishing you a delicious weekend!

Jennifer
Functional and Clinical Nutritionist

Do you need to take supplements?

Photo credit:  Pietro Jeng

Photo credit: Pietro Jeng

 

In functional medicine, we focus on natural ways to improve our health. That means food first. The functional medicine approach looks for the underlying causes of disease and illness and addresses it in order to improve health status. Health begins in the gut and often the underlying cause of what ails us is digestive and metabolic dysfunction.

 

Functional medicine practitioners use nutrient supplements, along with food, in clinical practice as the primary tools of treatment.

 

I've been asked, can't food be enough? After all, as a clinical nutritionist the expectation is that I'm going to create a diet plan to make you feel better. Yes! This is part of what I do. 

 

Sometimes, food isn't enough. This can happen as we age and bodily processes slow down and need a little extra help, when we have a functional deficit in a metabolic pathway, when our hormones become imbalanced, and when our guts aren't functioning the way they're supposed to. These are just some examples of when we may need a little more than what even the best, most thought through food plan can provide.

 

Our every day lives expose us to stress, environmental toxins, and lack of physical activity. We also experience inadequate exposure to sunlight, and many other problems associated with the 'conveniences' of Western society.

 

It is for these reasons that we can benefit from supplementing our healthful diets with extra nutrients. Some can help support metabolic pathways and therefore the biochemical reactions that make our bodies run. Others help support our immune system and combat oxidative stress and inflammation, two causes of chronic and complex disease.

 

I do believe that most of us can benefit from taking certain supplements.

 

To learn more about my take on specific supplement recommendations --> click here <--

 

Nutrient supplements are not medications. Prescription medications work by altering metabolic pathways, and even sometimes by shutting them down. All of the processes in our body are connected. When one is interrupted it can affect all others leading to chronic and complex disease. Nutrient supplements provide fuel (just as food can, when all else is in balance) for these processes to help them run. This is the difference between conventional medicine and the functional approach. 

 

So, are nutrient supplements necessary, and can't we get everything we need from food? My answers are sometimes, and maybe. 

 

Most of us know what a healthy diet should look like. When you are following a healthful eating plan and are still having symptoms that can't be explained or tied to anything in particular, this is when food may not be enough. If this sounds familiar I can help you get to the bottom of it.

 

To contact me --> click here <--

 

If you're ready for a strategy session with me --> click here <--

 

Are you looking for general information and just want to pick my brain? --> click here <--

 

Interested in only a diet plan? --> click here <--

 

 "Your nutritional needs are as unique as your fingerprint, and they are dictated by your individual biochemistry. As a functional and clinical nutritionist, I can help you interpret your body's nutrient needs and customize a plan to reach your health and wellness goals. This is personalized nutrition."
-Jennifer Caryn Brand, MPH, MS, CNS, Functional and Clinical Nutritionist
 


Wishing you a delicious weekend!



Jennifer
Functional and Clinical Nutritionist

Nutrition and Sleep - If you aren't sleeping, you're at risk for more than just being tired.

Photo credit:  pixabay.com

Photo credit: pixabay.com

If you have problems sleeping you are not alone. It is estimated that 50-70 million Americans have chronic sleeping problems.

 

Getting enough sleep is crucial to good health, and nutrition can influence sleep. There are diet, food and nutrient strategies that can be used to help you sleep better. 



Problems associated with lack of sleep:

 

 

There are a variety of reasons for sleeping problems and this is where we start looking to identify why you might have these issues in the first place. We start with things we eat or take that can keep us awake:

 

  • Alcohol

  • Nicotine

  • Caffeine

  • Decongestants like Sudafed

  • Diet pills

  • Ritalin or other stimulants

  • Herbs: Ginkgo biloba, Guarana, Siberian ginseng, Ephedra, Ma huang, Bitter orange, Kola nut

  • Medications: Beta blockers, Albuterol, SSRIs (antidepressants), Prednisone and other steroids

 

We want to avoid the things we can that may be contributing to sleeping problems like drinking alcohol and caffeine, smoking and use of elicit drugs. If you are on prescription medications that you feel are causing problems for you talk to your doctor before changing any prescribed medicine regimen.



Often sleeping problems are a symptom of another medical problem, and by addressing that underlying problem, we can improve sleep.



There are all sorts of conditions can interfere with sleep:

 

  • Anxiety

    • Diet, sleep affect each other. Anxiety makes getting restful sleep challenging and difficulty sleeping can cause anxiety. Reducing levels of anxiety is important, and meditation, yoga, and breathing exercises are examples of interventions my clients find helpful in reducing their anxiety levels.

  • Depression

  • Pain

    • Pain from any number of conditions can lead to poor sleep. Arthritis, headaches, reflux, and fibromyalgia, anything that causes pain can make it hard to fall asleep, and hard to stay asleep. Pain gets worse with lack of sleep. Addressing the underlying cause of pain can help improve sleep quality.

  • GERD (gastroesophageal reflux)

    • Reflux symptoms reduce quantity and quality of sleep.

    • Eating too much and eating too close to bedtime can cause GERD. Ideally, you should wait 4 hours between eating and going to bed.

    • There is a wide range of other reasons for GERD, so this is also something we explore when reflux is present, and GERD has many other problems associated with it aside from sleeping disturbances.

  • Menopause

    • Insomnia is considered a symptom of menopause. There are nutritional interventions that can help. Many are herbals. Keep in mind with herbal medicine that many pharmaceutical drugs are created based on the action of herbal medicines. Because of this, herbals can cause side effects and drug interactions just like pharmaceutical drugs can. The message here is don’t self medicate with herbals (for insomnia or any other reason). Talk to a professional to see what’s right for you.

  • Obstructive sleep apnea

    • This is disordered breathing during sleep. People that have sleep apnea have a greater risk for high blood pressure, heart attack, irregular heartbeat, diabetes, stroke, asthma, some cancers, cognitive and behavioral disorders in children and adults, and car accidents.

    • Common symptoms include snoring or gasping during sleep, and feeling fatigued during the day.

    • Many people that suffer from sleep apnea live in larger bodies, so nutrition plays a big role. Appropriately nourishing your body to reach a healthy weight is a primary intervention for sleep apnea, and often helps resolve the issue.

  • Sleep disordered breathing (general)

    • There are numerous other reasons that someone may be experiencing sleep disordered breathing, and The Breathe Institute in Los Angeles, CA specializes in addressing all causes of sleep disordered breathing using a multidisciplinary approach.

  • Desynchronosis

  • Stress

    • Stress is an unavoidable factor in our lives, and more stress leads to higher levels of cortisol. Cortisol stimulates insulin release, and over time, this can lead to diabetes. Managing cortisol levels by working on reducing stress is important for sleep and for overall health.

 

How we address the issue(s):

 

  • From a nutritional standpoint, we look at diet first of course to identify dietary triggers for the problem.

  • We also look for underlying conditions that are preventing adequate sleep, like sleep apnea, and reflux.

  • We can look to food as medicine to address any nutrient deficiencies that may be contributing to the issue. For example, food is a source of neurotransmitter precursors, where your neurotransmitter balance regulates your sleep, and mood in general.

  • Deficiency of certain vitamins and minerals can also disrupt sleep, so we can address these deficiencies by choosing foods containing the nutrients and supplement where necessary.

 


-->>Click here to watch and listen to my presentation on sleeping problems<<--


If you have problems sleeping, it is worthwhile to check out why. Contact me today and we can explore diet, food, nutrients and lifestyle interventions to help bring you relief and a good night’s sleep!

 

"Your nutritional needs are as unique as your fingerprint, and they are dictated by your individual biochemistry. As a functional and clinical nutritionist, I can help you interpret your body's nutrient needs and customize a plan to reach your health and wellness goals. This is personalized nutrition." -Jennifer Caryn Brand, MPH, MS, CNS, Clinical Nutritionist
 


Wishing you a delicious weekend!


Jennifer
Functional and Clinical Nutritionist

Copyright © 2018 Jennifer Caryn Brand Nutrition, All rights reserved. 

 

Supplements vs Prescription Medication

Photo credit:  freestocks.org

Photo credit: freestocks.org

In functional medicine, we focus on natural ways to improve our health. That means food first. The functional medicine approach looks for the underlying causes of disease and illness and addresses it in order to improve health status. Health begins in the gut and often the underlying cause of what ails us is digestive and metabolic dysfunction.

Functional medicine practitioners use nutrient supplements, along with food, in clinical practice as the primary tools of treatment.

I've been asked, can't food be enough? After all, as a clinical nutritionist the expectation is that I'm going to create a diet plan to make you feel better. Yes! This is part of what I do. 

Sometimes, food isn't enough. This can happen as we age and bodily processes slow down and need a little extra help, when we have a functional deficit in a metabolic pathway, when our hormones become imbalanced, and when our guts aren't functioning the way they're supposed to. These are just some examples of when we may need a little more than what even the best, most thought through food plan can provide.

Our every day lives expose us to stress, environmental toxins, and lack of physical activity. We also experience inadequate exposure to sunlight, and many other problems associated with the 'conveniences' of Western society.

It is for these reasons that we can benefit from supplementing our healthful diets with extra nutrients. Some can help support metabolic pathways and therefore the biochemical reactions that make our bodies run. Others help support our immune system and combat oxidative stress and inflammation, two causes of chronic and complex disease.

I do believe that most of us should be taking certain supplements.

To learn more about my take on specific supplement recommendations --> click here <--

Nutrient supplements are not medications. Prescription medications work by altering metabolic pathways, and even sometimes by shutting them down. All of the processes in our body are connected. When one is interrupted it can affect all others leading to chronic and complex disease. Nutrient supplements provide fuel (just as food can, when all else is in balance) for these processes to help them run. This is the difference between conventional medicine and the functional approach. 

So, are nutrient supplements necessary, and can't we get everything we need from food? My answers are sometimes, and maybe. 

Most of us know what a healthy diet should look like. When you are following a healthful eating plan and are still having symptoms that can't be explained or tied to anything in particular, this is when food may not be enough. If this sounds familiar I can help you get to the bottom of it.

To contact me --> click here <--

If you're ready for a strategy session with me --> click here <--

Are you looking for general information and just want to pick my brain? --> click here <--

Interested in only a diet plan? --> click here <--