lifestyle

How To Save Time Preparing For Your Diet Plan

Photo credit: Jan Sedivy

Photo credit: Jan Sedivy

One of the biggest challenges to making changes to your diet and sticking to your new plan is the time it takes to prepare good-for-you meals and healthy snacks.

 

Here are some tips to help you save time and stay on track!

 

  • Chop vegetables ahead of time, place in containers or bags so you can grab them on the go as snacks, or throw together a quick salad

    • Have a favorite vinegar on hand (balsamic, rice vinegar, red wine vinegar, fresh lemon or lime) and healthy oil (extra virgin olive oil or avocado oil) to make a quick dressing for salads

    • Add vegetables and the dressing to a container (even a large zip lock bag), shake to mix, and eat

      • Great for a quick on the go salad, and you can take it to work for lunch or a snack

      • Add hardboiled egg, chicken, nuts, or any other protein of choice to make it a meal

  • Invest in a crock-pot or instant-pot

    • Recipes are available everywhere, throw in your ingredients before you leave for work in the morning, turn on the machine, and when you arrive home, you’ll have a hot, home cooked meal waiting for you

    • Leftovers can be taken to work with you the next day for lunch

  • Shop online for groceries, there are a variety of options for this nowadays

  • Cook in large batches, divide food into smaller containers or freezer bags, and freeze to enjoy throughout the week, or to take with you to work

  • Cook with friends, and take turns making meals together to increase the fun factor and turn the work of cooking into a fun and social activity

  • Purchase pre-made meals and snacks, Territory FoodsBlue ApronFreshly, and Graze are examples of companies that deliver fresh ingredients to your door on a weekly basis, and you can search for more such companies in your area online**

    • Many deliver precooked meals, and also cater to special dietary needs

    • Some meal kits are now sold in stores, and the Guide to Cutting Meal Kit Costs provides helpful tips on how you can take advantage of savings

 

Need more assistance or have questions? Contact me today!

 

*Adapted from the Bioindividual Nutrition Institute

**This is not an endorsement for any particular company, these are simply examples of companies that provide meal services

If you need guidance on what to eat, The JCB Nutrition Food Pyramid and Diet Plan will help. The program will:

  • Help you understand which foods to avoid if you are embarking on an elimination diet

  • Teach you which healthy foods contain natural chemicals that can trigger symptoms including skin and gut issues, among MANY others

  • Show you what those natural food chemicals are

  • Teach you what foods are common allergens

  • Guide you in choosing what foods to eat and in what amounts

Tips For Navigating The Supermarket

Photo credit: rawpixel

Photo credit: rawpixel

First, you might be wondering what functional foods are. Functional foods are foods that may have positive effects on health, reaching beyond basic nutrition. Functional foods are health promoting and reduce the risk for disease. Where do you find functional foods? Read on.

Shop the perimeter of the store (avoid the aisles as much as possible because this is where the processed foods are). This is where you will find your produce, protein and dairy products, the functional foods. Start in the produce section and fill up your shopping cart with a variety of seasonal fruits and vegetables and select a variety of bright colors. Aim to try at least one new ‘fun’ fruit or vegetable per week.

Buy your meats at the butcher counter and buy organic/grass-fed/pastured/free-range products when possible. These types of animal products have a healthier fat and overall nutrient profile than their processed [grain fed] counterparts.

Purchase full fat dairy (and other) products. Low-fat and nonfat versions have sugars and other substances added to them in order to improve the taste and texture of these processed foods, so avoid them.

When it comes to condiments, read the labels. For oils, look for organic, and first cold pressed products. Avoid condiments that contain added sugars and high fructose corn syrup, and even agave (many salad dressings are loaded with extra sugars like this for example).

Because you are buying functional foods, many of them will not come in labeled packages, and this is good! When purchasing foods that do contain labels, if you can’t pronounce an ingredient, don’t buy it. Also, the fewer listed ingredients the better (5 or less is best). Remember that functional foods don’t have ingredients because they are ingredients!

Need more assistance or have questions? Contact me today!

Reference:

Zeratsky K. Healthy Lifestyle. Nutrition and healthy eating. Mayo Clinic.http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/functional-foods/faq-20057816. April 11, 2015. Accessed July 11, 2017.


If you need guidance on what to eat, The JCB Nutrition Food Pyramid and Diet Plan will help. The program will:

  • Help you understand which foods to avoid if you are embarking on an elimination diet

  • Teach you which healthy foods contain natural chemicals that can trigger symptoms including skin and gut issues, among MANY others

  • Show you what those natural food chemicals are

  • Teach you what foods are common allergens

  • Guide you in choosing what foods to eat and in what amounts

17 Healthy Snack Ideas

Photo credit: Kelly Sikkema

Photo credit: Kelly Sikkema

Healthy snacks are fuel to keep your engine burning optimally so you can crush your day. Your body needs macronutrients (carbohydrates, fat and protein) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) in order to carry out the wide range of biochemical reactions it needs to so that your heart beats, your lungs breathe, and your muscles move.

 

Keep in mind that not all foods are tolerated by all people. There are common food triggers that cause the majority of food reactions people experience. 

 

  • Milk and dairy products

  • Eggs

  • Nuts

  • Soy

  • Wheat and other gluten containing grains like barley, rye, and oats (look for oats that say gluten free on them)

  • Fish and shellfish 


Always take into account your individualized needs. If you need help determining what your personal tolerances are, contact me today to learn more about how I can help guide your journey to better health. 

 

The following snacks contain a variety of macro and micronutrients (make sure to account for your unique food tolerances):

 

  1. Hard-boiled eggs - protein, healthy fat (if sensitive to chicken eggs can try duck eggs)

  2. Seeds and nuts - protein, healthy fat, fiber, wide range of vitamins, minerals and other phytonutrients

  3. Dried fruit - carbohydrates, fiber, high in sugar so go lightly

  4. Sliced avocado

  5. Fresh fruit and vegetables - carbohydrates, fiber, wide range of vitamins, minerals and other phytonutrients

    • Cut up and dip in nut or seed butters, guacamole, and/or hummus if desired

  6. Vegetable chips/kale chips/beet chips

  7. Nut and seed crackers

  8. Roasted chickpeas, or other beans - protein, carbohydrates, fiber, wide range of vitamins and minerals

    • Drain canned chickpeas or other beans, place on a cookie sheet, add favorite seasonings, bake until crisp

  9. Natural beef, salmon or turkey jerky

    • Look for as few ingredients as possible

  10. Lara Bars, Rx Bars or Epic Bars

  11. Coconut yogurt 

  12. Fruit and nut/seed balls

    • Dried fruit (dates, raisins, prunes, apricots, etc.), nuts/seeds (sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, almonds, walnuts, etc.), add to a food processor and mix/blend until sticky, roll into balls, can roll in raw cacao powder (antioxidants, and minerals) if desired, keep refrigerated

  13. Cooked chicken thighs or cooked chicken breasts, meatballs or turkey balls, keep them ready in the fridge to grab on the go or in a pinch when you need a protein rich snack

  14. Dark chocolate, the darker the better, about 1 oz serving – antioxidants, minerals

  15. Power smoothie (in a blender, can use any combination of these items or similar items)

    • Protein powder of choice

    • Nuts, seeds, nut/seed butters

    • Kale, spinach, carrots, beets, broccoli, cauliflower, other vegetables

    • Blueberries, other berries, banana, apple, other fruit (go lighter on fruits, they add sugar, berries are lower in sugar/lower glycemic so use those when possible)

    • Almond milk or coconut milk (avoid soy milk, it can act like estrogen in the body, especially problematic for young boys)

    • Raw cacao powder, turmeric, cinnamon, other spices - anti-inflammatory and antioxidant nutrients

    • Avocado - healthy fat, fiber

    • Coconut oil - healthy fat

    • Coconut flakes

    • Ice

  16. 'Ice cream' the JCB Nutrition way

  17. Avocado chocolate pudding (seriously tastes like chocolate pudding)

 

Tip: Eating healthy sources of protein and fat throughout the day will help balance blood sugar levels, and therefore your mood and energy levels, and help you feel full longer. Ideally you should have some protein and healthy fat with each meal.

Need help or have questions? Contact me today! 

If you need guidance on what to eat, The JCB Nutrition Food Pyramid and Diet Plan will help. The program will:

  • Help you understand which foods to avoid if you are embarking on an elimination diet

  • Teach you which healthy foods contain natural chemicals that can trigger symptoms including skin and gut issues, among MANY others

  • Show you what those natural food chemicals are

  • Teach you what foods are common allergens

  • Guide you in choosing what foods to eat and in what amounts